Incredibly fast growing weeds

I’m including grass in that too; I only cut this two (or three) weeks ago. How is it this long again already?

One issue I have with this much grass is that it ends up almost entirely filling my garden waste bin. As its wet, the moisture all gathers at the bottom of the bin. I suppose this calls for very careful cutting of the grass the same week as the bins are taken away, otherwise it globs together and refuses to budge from the swampy bottom.

These unknown weeds are actually quite pretty. However, they’ve managed to amass themselves in force, now sixty, maybe seventy centimetres high. Culling them properly is taking me so long. I’m half thinking of just strimming them back and putting off removing them at the root until next year. However, that comes with the obvious disadvantage of not being able to use the soil they’re in right now for fear of them competing with whatever I chose to plant there.

This embarrassment is right at the back of our garden. The incineration bin is there only because we’ve not yet got a way of disposing of it. It’s ornamental by way of awaiting an empty enough bin. Those weeds beside it though, are horridly high. This area of the garden isn’t one I’ve yet found the time to touch. This feels like many evenings of work right here.

You see how the right side of the picture fades into darkness? That’s because that part of the garden is banked very steeply into the next door neighbour’s garden. A spot that I’ll have to work on, but maybe tethered to Tim in a bungee harness, or something.

Air Bug and Bee

There’s a small section of the garden which I’m sort of leaving to do its own thing. There’s actually a large area of the garden that’s currently doing its own thing, but this area of the garden I’m just leaving to be as it likes.

That seemed like the perfect place to put the newest of garden ornament we have; this bug home! It was given to us by Tim’s parents.

We’re both very excited to see what it’ll bring to the garden! Its ground dwelling, so I’m expecting smaller beetles and and bugs which aren’t scared away by the plastic creepy crawlies attached. I’m unsure if it’ll bring many solitary bees, but that’ll be fun if it does!

Regardless of what comes, the hope is that it’ll be filled with predators to pests.

The forgotten root

I planted this guy along the same time as I planted a few other things.

The camouflaged root.

The problem is that I’ve completely forgotten what it is. My guess is that’ it’s a phlox. My thinking is is that I bought the phlox and 3 globe thistles (which are growing nicely). These were planted on the 20th Februrary. I’ve since planted two or three more things. This is the only plant that hasn’t bothered growing of the lot. So it must be the odd one out.

It’s possible that this plant died during a March frost. It’s showed no sign of movement. However, gardening is supposed to be teaching me patience, so I shall keep watching it and see what happens.

Transferring the first seedlings

Back in March I added some seeds to my propagator, and some of them had started to grow tall enough to move to a larger pot. Today, I decided to move out the rest of the growers to let me recycle the propagator with another round of seeds.

The sunflowers appear to be growing the best. The peppers did not grow at all – in fact they failed with such a high failure rate it must have been something about the conditions I gave them that they didn’t like. The tomatoes have been moved to larger pots with bambo to climb. This all happened before today, leaving only the nasturtium and remaining marigolds behind.

The first of the videos I hope to add to this blog. It’s entirely out of focus.

Pots one through four has nasturtium in them. Having looked again the the packet, nasturtium looks like it could be grown quite closely together, so I possibly could have gotten away with two in each pot. Number four actually has two nasturtium in, as one was kind of weedy.

In number five I packed a couple of the lesser grown marigolds.

Despite what I said in the video, I didn’t use Black Plastic Pot for the marigolds, but I did pack them all into Grey French Bucket. A smaller vesel, but BPP seemed too big to fill with soil for those tiny plants. The marigolds are tightly packed now, with only a few centimeters between each. I’m assuming that fine. We’ll find out. (“I’m assuming that’s fine… We’ll find out.” should be the tagline of this blog.)

All the repotted plants are now in Tiny Greenhouse.

As a bonus piece of news, as mentioned in the video, I bought a potting table from Wayfair. I think I only paid around £32 for it, so it’s quite cheap. The assembly instructions recommend a drill and two people, but I managed it on my own with only a screwdriver and a bit of creative positioning. It hasn’t fallen over yet.

In the bin!

I’ve never been more excited to have a new bin.* I’m now the proud owner of a brown bin from the council to put my weeds in! Looks at this lovely trio. I couldn’t be more proud of them.

To get them from my council there’s a £30 (or so) a year charge, but I’ve got so many weeds to throw away that this’ll come very much in handy. Especially as we’ve no car to take this kind of rubbish away. (And Tim won’t let me use an incinerator in the garden!)

Maybe don’t do this. There needs to be more drainage.

My only other plan was to “mulch” down the weeds, which I’d heard was a thing. My methodology wasn’t going quite as well as expected though; leaving the weeds under a piece of tarp just made them damp and quite smelly.

*Until today when my bread bin arrived!

An update on what the primary focus area looks like

This is one of Tim’s pictures

This has been where I’ve spent most of my time. Starting small, and trying to see the impact on just one area.

Previously, this was fully of weeds of all kinds and most bare clay! I’ve thrown lots of soil on top of this, and started off some things growing; there’s a lavender there, a tomato plant under a Dr Pepper bottle (an experiment), some pansies waiting to be buried, and a few other things which I’ve immediately forgotten.

Hopefully, one of the purposes of this blog will be for me to keep track of what I’m growing, and where!

Late night sowing

This system of laying out the seed packets and then taking a photo of them isn’t the wisest. I’m assuming that the last three are marigolds and the three before that are nasturtium, but who knows. The two columns in the middle could be anything.

I made quite the effort to just get one seed in each pot to begin with. However, I got bored of that rather quickly and just started dashing them into thumble-sized holes.

These are going to live in my conservatory for the next few weeks. The conservatory gets rather warm during the day, but almost as cold as outside during the night. So, I’m not entirely sure they’ll survive a late March cold snap, but we’ll see.